FAQs

What are prosthetic appliances, and what are they made of?
Are they reusable?
Which material should I choose?
What adhesives/makeup should I use with my prosthetic?
Do you offer adhesives/makeup/other application materials?
How long will it take to receive my order?
Do you do custom prosthetics and how much will it cost?
Do you still make furry stuff?

 

What are prosthetic appliances, and what are they made of?

Prosthetics, or prosthetic appliances, are fake wounds or character pieces that are applied to an actor or model using adhesive and makeup to simulate injury or to create creatures and characters. Our prosthetics are made from slush cast latex, though we will soon be offering silicone and encapsulated silicone pieces as well, and have already started offering these as custom orders.

Are they reusable?

That depends on the material you use, but mostly, yes. Slush cast latex appliances and silicone prosthetics can usually be reused several times (just be careful with your edges upon removal). However, encapsulated silicone is usually a one-time deal - though I know some have gotten away with patching them to reuse a few times.

Which material should I choose?

This largely depends on your budget and preference on realism.

  • Slush cast latex is great if you need something durable that won't break the bank, but you will sacrifice some realism as it is tougher and doesn't bend well in places that move often (i.e. the face), and has edges that are often more difficult to blend than other materials - it's very difficult to get paper-thin edges with latex, so there will likely be an obvious seam around your prosthetic unless you take care to blend it out well. Luckily, there is very little limit to what you can use to adhere, blend and color it.
  • Silicone is more expensive but is also reusable and beautifully realistic: it's soft, pliable and has a translucency similar to skin. However, silicone is also rather fragile so they will often have slightly-thicker-than encapsulated silicone edges to avoid tearing, and they will require the use of specific adhesives and makeup.
  • Encapsulated silicone will be roughly the same cost as silicone and is just as soft, pliable and translucent. Its edges provide the least obvious seam as they are literally melted away during application to blend into the skin - if you want to get up close and personal or are doing high-definition photographs or film, this will likely look the most realistic. Like latex, these can also use almost any adhesive/makeup. for application. Unfortunately, these are, as stated above, usually one-time uses, so be prepared to order more if you need the look you're creating for more than one day.

What adhesives/makeup should I use with my prosthetic?

Adhesive: If you are using latex or encapsulated silicone, almost any makeup adhesive will work: spirit gum, pros-aide, telesis, you name it. I don't recommend using liquid latex if you plan to reuse your latex appliance as it will start to build up around your edges after a couple uses which will make it harder and harder to blend out. If you have a silicone prosthetic, you will need an adhesive specifically formulated for silicone: Telesis, Snappy G, and Skin Tite are a few examples. Pros-Aide can be used to adhere silicone appliances, but due to the potential for trapped moisture, may not stick as long.

Makeup: Any makeups I've used on encapsulated silicone seem to work fine: cream paint, alcohol-activated makeup, rubber mask greasepaint, etc - so there shouldn't be much problem there. Latex can hold most types of makeup as well, but if you want to use oil-based or cream-based makeups, make sure you seal your prosthetic with Pros-Aide or makeup sealer such as Castor Seal first; otherwise, the makeup can eat away at your prosthetic. For silicone appliances, not much likes to stick to silicone, so your best bet will be to use alcohol-activated makeup, such as Skin Illustrator.

Do you offer adhesives/makeup/other application materials?

Currently, Acrotomic Studios offers Pros-Aide adhesive and remover, as well as some cream makeup color wheels from Graftobian. Adhesives and makeup can be found here.

There are plans to carry other adhesives, makeups, and materials in the future.

How long will it take to receive my order?

I try to keep a healthy stock of shop inventory, so most orders will be shipped within 3 days. In the event an item is out of stock, it will usually be cast and shipped within a week of purchase. After that, it will depend on which shipping option you choose.

Do you do custom prosthetics and how much will it cost?

Yes, I love doing custom orders. If you do not already have a concept design, I'm happy to provide that, too. The cost will vary based on material, size, placement, complexity, etc, but they will cost more than the prosthetics in the shop. For example, a simple wound may be around $40-80, while a custom brow prosthetic can be anywhere from $70-150 or more, and larger/more complex pieces will be even more. The reason for this is because I must calculate in the time to sculpt, mold and cast (and design the concept art if needed), as well as the materials to mold and cast. If the design is something you do not mind being reused and I think it can be sold in-store in the future, I may be able to offer a discount on sculpting and molding your prosthetic.

Do you still make furry stuff?

Occasionally, yes. Most of my working time is spent on prosthetic-making in the workshop, but I sometimes manage to whip up a tail or two to post in the store. Most of the furry items I make nowadays, though, are customized tails listed in the shop or fully custom orders. For the time being, I am no longer making fursuit heads, but am happy to continue taking on orders for paws, tails and ears.